Squandrous

To all those people who have asked me why I think Friday Night Lights is one of the best shows ever to grace a television screen, please read this:


  "There are a handful of shows I ask everyone I talk to about television if they have seen: The Wire, Mad Men, Friday Night Lights. But when I ask them if they’ve watched and loved Friday Night Lights, what I mean is are you my kind of person? Are you all heart? Are you bothered by this 21st-century lack of earnestness, our abundance of irony? Do you wonder how we forgive and coach ourselves to do better? How we can strive again for valor and loyalty and daring and redemption?
  
  I fear we are defaulting to needless negativity as some kind of social currency. But Friday Night Lights is the most earnest show I’ve ever watched. Not sentimental, however: these characters aren’t perfect. In fact, this show is incredibly astute at allowing humans to have stratums of complexity: to have character and occasionally act without it, and then to live in the mire of their own dumb choices. Do I adore Coach? Yes. Do I think, as Tammy says, he is a molder of men and a husband of fierce devotion? Absolutely. Do I also think he can also be a self-involved, sexist prick who values his career over his wife’s? No question.
  
  Regardless of the scale of the battle, the stakes in Friday Night Lights are rarely phony or contrived. It’s about winning games, sure, but its scope far exceeds that. This is a show that tests and reflects commitment not just on the football field, but back in the locker room. And in Street’s rehab room, and Saracen’s grandmother’s living room, and Julie’s bedroom, and eventually out to Luke’s farm and Tim’s prison and Tammy’s dream in Philadelphia. This commitment is not about obligation, but something more sacred. Duty. The hidden gale that blusters and grows within us and makes us yearn to give someone else exactly what they need.”
  
  —Erica Cantoni on Friday Night Lights


(via)

To all those people who have asked me why I think Friday Night Lights is one of the best shows ever to grace a television screen, please read this:

"There are a handful of shows I ask everyone I talk to about television if they have seen: The Wire, Mad Men, Friday Night Lights. But when I ask them if they’ve watched and loved Friday Night Lights, what I mean is are you my kind of person? Are you all heart? Are you bothered by this 21st-century lack of earnestness, our abundance of irony? Do you wonder how we forgive and coach ourselves to do better? How we can strive again for valor and loyalty and daring and redemption?

I fear we are defaulting to needless negativity as some kind of social currency. But Friday Night Lights is the most earnest show I’ve ever watched. Not sentimental, however: these characters aren’t perfect. In fact, this show is incredibly astute at allowing humans to have stratums of complexity: to have character and occasionally act without it, and then to live in the mire of their own dumb choices. Do I adore Coach? Yes. Do I think, as Tammy says, he is a molder of men and a husband of fierce devotion? Absolutely. Do I also think he can also be a self-involved, sexist prick who values his career over his wife’s? No question.

Regardless of the scale of the battle, the stakes in Friday Night Lights are rarely phony or contrived. It’s about winning games, sure, but its scope far exceeds that. This is a show that tests and reflects commitment not just on the football field, but back in the locker room. And in Street’s rehab room, and Saracen’s grandmother’s living room, and Julie’s bedroom, and eventually out to Luke’s farm and Tim’s prison and Tammy’s dream in Philadelphia. This commitment is not about obligation, but something more sacred. Duty. The hidden gale that blusters and grows within us and makes us yearn to give someone else exactly what they need.”

Erica Cantoni on Friday Night Lights

(via)

Miles.

Even our concepts about romantic love, I think, are destructive; treating people as property is destructive; being jealous of other people is destructive. You know, being jealous is a perfectly natural thing to feel, so it’s not about suppressing jealousy, but learning to come to terms with it and to recognize its destructiveness and then to transform it.

Jeff Mangum (via)
These mugs will definitely appeal to a few people I know. (via).

These mugs will definitely appeal to a few people I know. (via).

I will write you love letters, Charlie Brown.

I will write you love letters, Charlie Brown.

This is huge news:


  Beginning today and lasting to the end of the summer, the New Yorker website is free — and includes its complete archive. Our humble suggestions of where to begin your reading frenzy.


I began subscribing to the New Yorker when I was seven years old, and used to read every single issue, front to back, every week for two decades. Towards the end, I found that the unread magazines would up on my coffee table, causing me anxiety. I finally canceled my print subscription three years ago, but have been a digital subscriber since then.

As a New Yorker reader for twenty-five years now, I can think of at least a hundred articles in the magazine that have had resonance for me. Now that the archives are free, I’ll definitely be sending a few of those to people  I know.

This is huge news:

Beginning today and lasting to the end of the summer, the New Yorker website is free — and includes its complete archive. Our humble suggestions of where to begin your reading frenzy.

I began subscribing to the New Yorker when I was seven years old, and used to read every single issue, front to back, every week for two decades. Towards the end, I found that the unread magazines would up on my coffee table, causing me anxiety. I finally canceled my print subscription three years ago, but have been a digital subscriber since then.

As a New Yorker reader for twenty-five years now, I can think of at least a hundred articles in the magazine that have had resonance for me. Now that the archives are free, I’ll definitely be sending a few of those to people I know.

Apparently Clay Aiken had a hit song that nobody listened to:


  Some pop songs are timeless classics. Some play endlessly at weddings and on oldies stations. Others find renewed vigor in movie trailers or because their lyrics can be applied to Golden Grahams. Still others just, well – disappear.
  
  We started with the top 10 songs of each year from 1900 to present (as calculated by the Whitburn Project), recording each song’s Google hits, Wikipedia presence and last.fm scrobbles to calculate an obscurity score.

Apparently Clay Aiken had a hit song that nobody listened to:

Some pop songs are timeless classics. Some play endlessly at weddings and on oldies stations. Others find renewed vigor in movie trailers or because their lyrics can be applied to Golden Grahams. Still others just, well – disappear.

We started with the top 10 songs of each year from 1900 to present (as calculated by the Whitburn Project), recording each song’s Google hits, Wikipedia presence and last.fm scrobbles to calculate an obscurity score.

…and we drink our
coffee and pretend
not to look at
each other.

Charles Bukowski, Luck (via)
Gorgeous. (via)
Gorgeous. (via)
Gorgeous. (via)
Gorgeous. (via)
Gorgeous. (via)
Gorgeous. (via)
Gorgeous. (via)
Gorgeous. (via)
Gorgeous. (via)

Gorgeous. (via)

Almost impossible to sleep; plagued by dreams, as if they were being scratched on me, on a stubborn material.

Franz Kafka (via)
Made me laugh. (via)

Made me laugh. (via)

These fake vintage ads made me laugh out loud:


  "Ads Libitum" is a new series that inserts musicians, presumably against their will, into familiar vintage-style American advertisements and archetypes. Created by French artist David Redon, the series uses the hand-painted aesthetic of mid-20th century to turn modern musicians songs into sales pitches.
These fake vintage ads made me laugh out loud:


  "Ads Libitum" is a new series that inserts musicians, presumably against their will, into familiar vintage-style American advertisements and archetypes. Created by French artist David Redon, the series uses the hand-painted aesthetic of mid-20th century to turn modern musicians songs into sales pitches.
These fake vintage ads made me laugh out loud:


  "Ads Libitum" is a new series that inserts musicians, presumably against their will, into familiar vintage-style American advertisements and archetypes. Created by French artist David Redon, the series uses the hand-painted aesthetic of mid-20th century to turn modern musicians songs into sales pitches.
These fake vintage ads made me laugh out loud:


  "Ads Libitum" is a new series that inserts musicians, presumably against their will, into familiar vintage-style American advertisements and archetypes. Created by French artist David Redon, the series uses the hand-painted aesthetic of mid-20th century to turn modern musicians songs into sales pitches.

These fake vintage ads made me laugh out loud:

"Ads Libitum" is a new series that inserts musicians, presumably against their will, into familiar vintage-style American advertisements and archetypes. Created by French artist David Redon, the series uses the hand-painted aesthetic of mid-20th century to turn modern musicians songs into sales pitches.

Of course that is not the whole story, but that is the way with stories; we make them what we will. It’s a way of explaining the universe while leaving the universe unexplained, it’s a way of keeping it all alive, not boxing it into time. Everyone who tells a story tells it differently, just to remind us that everybody sees it differently.

Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (via)
If Disney princesses were actually sloths. This is wonderful. (via)
If Disney princesses were actually sloths. This is wonderful. (via)
If Disney princesses were actually sloths. This is wonderful. (via)
If Disney princesses were actually sloths. This is wonderful. (via)
If Disney princesses were actually sloths. This is wonderful. (via)
If Disney princesses were actually sloths. This is wonderful. (via)
If Disney princesses were actually sloths. This is wonderful. (via)
If Disney princesses were actually sloths. This is wonderful. (via)
Yup. (via)

Yup. (via)