Squandrous

I am the woman you laughed at on the Internet

This article perfectly encapsulates why shaming strangers on the internet without their knowledge or context makes me feel so uncomfortable.

What Happened to Lake Erie? A brilliant comic on the fight to save a Great Lake, a lake that means a lot to me.
What Happened to Lake Erie? A brilliant comic on the fight to save a Great Lake, a lake that means a lot to me.

What Happened to Lake Erie? A brilliant comic on the fight to save a Great Lake, a lake that means a lot to me.

Low prices don’t exist in a vacuum.
My postage bill for this month is going to be a lot higher than it usually is — and that’s saying a lot since my average monthly postage budget is often more than most people spend on postage in a whole year.

As long as it makes people smile, then it’s all worth it.

My postage bill for this month is going to be a lot higher than it usually is — and that’s saying a lot since my average monthly postage budget is often more than most people spend on postage in a whole year.

As long as it makes people smile, then it’s all worth it.

Surround yourself with people that strive to do good for the sake of just doing good. There is something alive in those people’s hearts that has been lost for the rest of mankind.

Affinage, a short film about the making of cheese.

Sometimes, carrying on, just carrying on, is the superhuman achievement.

Albert Camus, The Fall (via)
Gawker has identified “the pizza belt” of America, which is defined thusly:


  The Pizza Belt is defined as “the area of the United States where the chance of obtaining an adequate-to-good slice of pizza from a randomly chosen pizzeria is greater than 50 percent.”
  
  Taken at its strictest, The True Pizza Belt runs, more or less contiguously, hugging the coast, from southern New Jersey to Providence, R.I. (The map reproduced above provides a general but necessarily inexact guide.)
  
  Lowering the chances to one in three, or slightly expanding our definition of “adequate,” gives us The Greater Pizza Belt Area, a zone spanning Washington D.C., to Boston, Mass., going no further inland than Albany, N.Y.
  
  Chicago is not in the Pizza Belt. I have no desire to discuss Chicago-style pizza.
  
  Neither is San Francisco, for Christ’s sake.
  
  Indeed: Beyond the Greater Pizza Belt Area is a wasteland. In most parts of California, for example, the chance that a randomly-chosen pizzeria will produce adequate-to-good slices of pizza is close to one in eight; in Los Angeles it is lower than one in ten. Here, there is bad pizza—in the vast wilderness, in الربع الخالي‎. We do not speak of it.

Gawker has identified “the pizza belt” of America, which is defined thusly:

The Pizza Belt is defined as “the area of the United States where the chance of obtaining an adequate-to-good slice of pizza from a randomly chosen pizzeria is greater than 50 percent.”

Taken at its strictest, The True Pizza Belt runs, more or less contiguously, hugging the coast, from southern New Jersey to Providence, R.I. (The map reproduced above provides a general but necessarily inexact guide.)

Lowering the chances to one in three, or slightly expanding our definition of “adequate,” gives us The Greater Pizza Belt Area, a zone spanning Washington D.C., to Boston, Mass., going no further inland than Albany, N.Y.

Chicago is not in the Pizza Belt. I have no desire to discuss Chicago-style pizza.

Neither is San Francisco, for Christ’s sake.

Indeed: Beyond the Greater Pizza Belt Area is a wasteland. In most parts of California, for example, the chance that a randomly-chosen pizzeria will produce adequate-to-good slices of pizza is close to one in eight; in Los Angeles it is lower than one in ten. Here, there is bad pizza—in the vast wilderness, in الربع الخالي‎. We do not speak of it.

My wish for you is that you continue. Continue to be who and how you are, to astonish a mean world with your acts of kindness. Continue to allow humor to lighten the burden of your tender heart.

Maya Angelou (via)
8 Deadly Cat Sins, by Marija Tiurina (via)
8 Deadly Cat Sins, by Marija Tiurina (via)
8 Deadly Cat Sins, by Marija Tiurina (via)
8 Deadly Cat Sins, by Marija Tiurina (via)
8 Deadly Cat Sins, by Marija Tiurina (via)
8 Deadly Cat Sins, by Marija Tiurina (via)
8 Deadly Cat Sins, by Marija Tiurina (via)
8 Deadly Cat Sins, by Marija Tiurina (via)

Success is being able to look in the mirror and know that I am all right on that day. I don’t believe I’ve made it. I believe that I’m making it. I believe that I found my past so I can live in the present. It’s the most important thing to me. In the books and the plays and the touring and the gigs and the speeches and the – and the cash – it all pales into insignificance when compared with knowing that I didn’t do anything wrong. And I’m OK now.

Time heals all wounds. And if it doesn’t, you name them something other than wounds and agree to let them stay.

Emma Forrest, Your Voice in My Head (via)
Accurate. (via)

Accurate. (via)

The education system has to act to mitigate the class system, not reproduce it. Affirmative action should be based on class instead of race, a change that many have been advocating for years. Preferences for legacies and athletes ought to be discarded. SAT scores should be weighted to account for socioeconomic factors. Colleges should put an end to résumé-stuffing by imposing a limit on the number of extracurriculars that kids can list on their applications. They ought to place more value on the kind of service jobs that lower-income students often take in high school and that high achievers almost never do. They should refuse to be impressed by any opportunity that was enabled by parental wealth. Of course, they have to stop cooperating with U.S. News.

More broadly, they need to rethink their conception of merit. If schools are going to train a better class of leaders than the ones we have today, they’re going to have to ask themselves what kinds of qualities they need to promote. Selecting students by GPA or the number of extracurriculars more often benefits the faithful drudge than the original mind.

An excellent piece on the rise of emoji and what it could mean for the way we communicate:


  This “emojis are the end of language” complaint, usually seen in the comments below articles rather than in the articles themselves, is a variation on the more common theme “emojis are dumb and make us dumber,” painting a picture of the entire human race as a horde of blithering idiots unable to communicate without typing pictures. It’s a bit bleak, and doesn’t really put a lot of faith in us as individual people with our own brains and agency, but the flip side is that in this potential future the entire human race is communicating with each other. Could it really be that the great promise of the World Wide Web has been achieved by the likes of unamused face, blowing kiss face, and smiley poop? It’s a disconcertingly simple solution. Emojis are small in size but huge in reach—perhaps nothing so tiny has been so universally known since Walt Disney introduced the world to Mickey Mouse. This strange incongruity might be part of why we can’t seem to stop talking about emojis.

An excellent piece on the rise of emoji and what it could mean for the way we communicate:

This “emojis are the end of language” complaint, usually seen in the comments below articles rather than in the articles themselves, is a variation on the more common theme “emojis are dumb and make us dumber,” painting a picture of the entire human race as a horde of blithering idiots unable to communicate without typing pictures. It’s a bit bleak, and doesn’t really put a lot of faith in us as individual people with our own brains and agency, but the flip side is that in this potential future the entire human race is communicating with each other. Could it really be that the great promise of the World Wide Web has been achieved by the likes of unamused face, blowing kiss face, and smiley poop? It’s a disconcertingly simple solution. Emojis are small in size but huge in reach—perhaps nothing so tiny has been so universally known since Walt Disney introduced the world to Mickey Mouse. This strange incongruity might be part of why we can’t seem to stop talking about emojis.