Squandrous

"Unreal Estate " by Tim Doyle (via)
"Unreal Estate " by Tim Doyle (via)
"Unreal Estate " by Tim Doyle (via)
"Unreal Estate " by Tim Doyle (via)
"Unreal Estate " by Tim Doyle (via)
"Unreal Estate " by Tim Doyle (via)

"Unreal Estate " by Tim Doyle (via)

1984 was pop’s greatest year…

…and Prince was the best thing about it:

In a feature just published today, Rolling Stone declares 2014 the 30th anniversary of “pop’s greatest year.” 1984 was “the year that pop stood tallest,” according to several collaborators on a feature listing the 100 best songs of that year. And who stood tallest in 1984?

Well, Madonna was pretty good—her “Borderline” comes in at #2. Michael Jackson? Yeah, “Thriller” merits a #4 slot. But the artist who towered over this “greatest year” in pop history, says Rolling Stone, was Prince. Tracks from Purple Rain occupy three out of the list’s top ten slots, coming in at #1 (“When Doves Cry”), #4 (“Let’s Go Crazy”), and #8 (“Purple Rain”).

Perhaps even more incredible is how the list evidences Prince’s wide-ranging influence. In addition to the Purple Rain tracks released by Prince himself, the Purple One is also closely associated with several more tracks on the list.

Happiness is beneficial for the body, but it is grief that develops the powers of the mind.

Marcel Proust (via)
@thingsdrakedo — made me laugh, loudly. (via)
@thingsdrakedo — made me laugh, loudly. (via)
@thingsdrakedo — made me laugh, loudly. (via)
@thingsdrakedo — made me laugh, loudly. (via)
@thingsdrakedo — made me laugh, loudly. (via)
@thingsdrakedo — made me laugh, loudly. (via)

@thingsdrakedo — made me laugh, loudly. (via)

Bryan Cranston’s hilarious one-man show about baseball. (Not a real show, sadly, but a great video on what it would be like if he did, actually, take the stage.)

The Coolest Girl You Know Probably Uses a Flip Phone

A flip phone represents the ultimate luxury: inaccessibility. The most alluring thing about people with flip phones is the vote of confidence they are giving themselves (and their social lives) by not giving people a 24/7 way to reach them, across multiple platforms. It’s like they have an innate trust that the people who really want to talk to them will seek them out, will still want to talk to them three hours after sending an email. They can go off the radar without worrying that people will forget about them while they’re gone.

Gainsbourg & Birkin. (via)

Gainsbourg & Birkin. (via)

(via)

(via)

A well-designed airport changes the way we look at a city:


  Forget museums, airports are now responsible for the most exciting architecture in any urban landscape.
  
  The gateway to a city has always been a symbol of civic pride. In the 5th century BC, Nebuchadnezzar II (he of the fiery furnace) ordered the construction of the Ishtar Gate in Babylon - then the world’s greatest city. Now in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, until bounced off the list 200 years later by the Lighthouse of Alexandria, it was counted as one of the Seven Wonders Of The World. In Paris, at the start of the 19th century, Napoleon commissioned the Arc de Triomphe as a theatrical entrance to Paris.
  
  And it isn’t just literal gates. In London, Tower Bridge was designed as a grand entrance to the world’s then greatest imperial city. Now airports are the shiny gateways to the cities of the 21st century.
A well-designed airport changes the way we look at a city:


  Forget museums, airports are now responsible for the most exciting architecture in any urban landscape.
  
  The gateway to a city has always been a symbol of civic pride. In the 5th century BC, Nebuchadnezzar II (he of the fiery furnace) ordered the construction of the Ishtar Gate in Babylon - then the world’s greatest city. Now in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, until bounced off the list 200 years later by the Lighthouse of Alexandria, it was counted as one of the Seven Wonders Of The World. In Paris, at the start of the 19th century, Napoleon commissioned the Arc de Triomphe as a theatrical entrance to Paris.
  
  And it isn’t just literal gates. In London, Tower Bridge was designed as a grand entrance to the world’s then greatest imperial city. Now airports are the shiny gateways to the cities of the 21st century.
A well-designed airport changes the way we look at a city:


  Forget museums, airports are now responsible for the most exciting architecture in any urban landscape.
  
  The gateway to a city has always been a symbol of civic pride. In the 5th century BC, Nebuchadnezzar II (he of the fiery furnace) ordered the construction of the Ishtar Gate in Babylon - then the world’s greatest city. Now in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, until bounced off the list 200 years later by the Lighthouse of Alexandria, it was counted as one of the Seven Wonders Of The World. In Paris, at the start of the 19th century, Napoleon commissioned the Arc de Triomphe as a theatrical entrance to Paris.
  
  And it isn’t just literal gates. In London, Tower Bridge was designed as a grand entrance to the world’s then greatest imperial city. Now airports are the shiny gateways to the cities of the 21st century.

A well-designed airport changes the way we look at a city:

Forget museums, airports are now responsible for the most exciting architecture in any urban landscape.

The gateway to a city has always been a symbol of civic pride. In the 5th century BC, Nebuchadnezzar II (he of the fiery furnace) ordered the construction of the Ishtar Gate in Babylon - then the world’s greatest city. Now in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, until bounced off the list 200 years later by the Lighthouse of Alexandria, it was counted as one of the Seven Wonders Of The World. In Paris, at the start of the 19th century, Napoleon commissioned the Arc de Triomphe as a theatrical entrance to Paris.

And it isn’t just literal gates. In London, Tower Bridge was designed as a grand entrance to the world’s then greatest imperial city. Now airports are the shiny gateways to the cities of the 21st century.

William Burroughs. (via)

William Burroughs. (via)

Godzilla vs. Charles Barkley. One of my favorite ads when I was younger. (via)
Godzilla vs. Charles Barkley. One of my favorite ads when I was younger. (via)
Godzilla vs. Charles Barkley. One of my favorite ads when I was younger. (via)
Godzilla vs. Charles Barkley. One of my favorite ads when I was younger. (via)
Godzilla vs. Charles Barkley. One of my favorite ads when I was younger. (via)
Godzilla vs. Charles Barkley. One of my favorite ads when I was younger. (via)
Godzilla vs. Charles Barkley. One of my favorite ads when I was younger. (via)
Godzilla vs. Charles Barkley. One of my favorite ads when I was younger. (via)
Godzilla vs. Charles Barkley. One of my favorite ads when I was younger. (via)

Godzilla vs. Charles Barkley. One of my favorite ads when I was younger. (via)

In The Atlantic, Joseph Vogel argues that Janet Jackson is the most culturally significant female artist of the 1980s:


  I realize that’s a big claim for a decade that included such talents as Whitney Houston, Tina Turner, Annie Lennox, Cyndi Lauper, and Madonna. It may seem even more dubious given the fact that Janet really only emerged as a major figure in 1986 with the release of Control—and only released two substantial albums over the course of the decade. Janet didn’t have the vocal prowess of Whitney Houston, or the poetic subtlety of Kate Bush; she didn’t have Annie Lennox’s penchant for the avant-garde or Madonna’s predilection for shock.
  
  But none of these artists achieved the cross-racial impact (particularly on youth culture) of Janet. And none of them had an album like Rhythm Nation 1814.

In The Atlantic, Joseph Vogel argues that Janet Jackson is the most culturally significant female artist of the 1980s:

I realize that’s a big claim for a decade that included such talents as Whitney Houston, Tina Turner, Annie Lennox, Cyndi Lauper, and Madonna. It may seem even more dubious given the fact that Janet really only emerged as a major figure in 1986 with the release of Control—and only released two substantial albums over the course of the decade. Janet didn’t have the vocal prowess of Whitney Houston, or the poetic subtlety of Kate Bush; she didn’t have Annie Lennox’s penchant for the avant-garde or Madonna’s predilection for shock.

But none of these artists achieved the cross-racial impact (particularly on youth culture) of Janet. And none of them had an album like Rhythm Nation 1814.

'Language Of Food' Reveals Mysteries Of Menu Words

I need to read this book:

Inhabitants of the southern coastal regions of China had for centuries preserved seafood by “layering local fish in jars with cooked rice and salt, covered with bamboo leaves, and left to ferment. The enzymes in the fish convert the starch in the rice to lactic acid, resulting in a salty, pickled fish that could be eaten by scraping off the goopy fermented rice,” Jurafsky writes in his book. The recipe was written down in the 5th century and is still used today in parts of Southeast Asia.

In the 17th century, English and Dutch sailors and traders traveled to Asia, “and they brought home barrels of this Chinese fish sauce, and this fish sauce was called ketchup. -Tchup is a word for sauce in Chinese dialects,” he says. And the syllable ke means “preserved fish” in Hokkien, the language of southern Fujian and Taiwan.

The sailors, probably hoping to perk up their hardtack, quickly adopted the fishy ketchup, and merchants saw the opportunity to sell an expensive and exotic sauce from Asia to Europeans, Jurafsky writes.

By the 19th century, the British were making their own ketchup, adding tomatoes but still relying on anchovies for flavor, as evidenced by early recipes, Jurafsky says. Eventually, tastes changed and the anchovies were out while other ingredients like mushrooms and oysters came into vogue. “Ketchup” became a catchall word for a spiced sauce.

There seems to be a misconception about what 3D printing does and does not enable. Does it allow us to delight a four-year-old by pulling a mini Darth Vader toy seemingly out of thin air? It does. But the object doesn’t materialize from nothing. A 3D printer consumes about 50 to 100 times more electrical energy than injection molding to make an item of the same weight. On top of that, the emissions from desktop 3D printers are similar to burning a cigarette or cooking on a gas or electric stove. And the material of choice for all this new stuff we’re clamoring to make is overwhelmingly plastic. In a sense, it’s a reverse environmental offset, counteracting recent legislation to reduce plastic use through grocery bag bans and packaging redesigns. While more people tote reuasable cloth bags to the supermarket, plastic is piling up in other domains, from TechShop to Target.

Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck creates collages from cutouts from ads that appeared in vintage magazines. The results are fascinating.
Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck creates collages from cutouts from ads that appeared in vintage magazines. The results are fascinating.
Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck creates collages from cutouts from ads that appeared in vintage magazines. The results are fascinating.
Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck creates collages from cutouts from ads that appeared in vintage magazines. The results are fascinating.

Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck creates collages from cutouts from ads that appeared in vintage magazines. The results are fascinating.